The 8 New Year’s Resolutions You Shouldn’t Be Making

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The 8 New Year’s Resolutions You Shouldn’t Be Making

According to a 2013 article published by Forbes, a measly 8% of people actually achieve their New Year’s Resolutions.[1] So we aren’t going to spend time telling you why you should make them or which ones you should make. Instead, we’re focusing on the resolutions you shouldn’t waste your time on. Maybe by focusing efforts on actually attainable goals, we can be part of a movement that boosts that 8% upward!

Without further ado, here are the eight resolutions you shouldn’t make this year.

Lose weight. This is the Holy Grail of New Year’s Resolutions, but most people fail to meet their weight loss goals right out of the gate. Instead of concentrating on pounds, focus on getting healthier. Make better food decisions and exercise choices. This way, if the weight doesn’t immediately melt away, you won’t become disappointed and throw in the towel.

Work out every day. By establishing such a strict guideline, you’re essentially setting yourself up for failure. Instead of focusing on exercise every single day, you should set the goal of “working out more.” And keep it as open as that. “Working out more” might mean an additional ten minutes to your routine, or one more session a week. It’s your call.

Think better thoughts. Yes, having a positive mental outlook is essential for your wellbeing. But if you’re simply brushing troublesome thoughts under the rug, they’re bound to reappear at some point further down the road. Instead of trying to have a “happy” mindset, this year try focusing more on where your thoughts are actually coming from and how you respond to them.

No more junk food. There’s a reason many industry-leading fitness experts recommend a cheat day when you’re dieting. The human brain is wired to want what it can’t have, so when you say absolutely no junk food, you actually end up craving it more. Try limiting it or making healthier substitutes instead of going cold turkey.

Cut or restrict TV watching. Sometimes you just need to turn your brain off and television viewing provides an excellent way to do that. Switch to watching more informative TV shows and movies, like documentaries or educational pieces, instead of cutting it out altogether. That way you’re still learning something while relaxing.

Try new experiences. Sounds innocent enough, but what if you really love the experiences you’ve already done? Maybe this year you should narrow down your time to get really good at one thing in particular, or doing just the tried and true activities that bring you the most joy.

Get promoted. First of all, this resolution is mostly out of your control. Sure, you can work harder and longer hours, but you ultimately can’t make that decision. That’s up to your HR and management. You can however dedicate yourself to becoming the go-to person who has all of the answers that apply to your specific job title. This year set the goal of becoming the absolute expert in your current position.

Pay off all debt. It is absolutely essential to your financial health that you get your debt taken care of as quickly as possible. However, instead of looking at it as a huge, overwhelming whole, break it down by pieces. Focus instead on chipping away at the debt with the highest interest first. After that, start plugging away at debt that is a little more forgiving.

We hope these resolutions will help you focus on attainable goals and that you are successful with them all year long. What are some of the resolutions you’re dedicating yourself to this year?

~

[1] Diamond, D. (2013). Just 8% of people achieve their New Year’s Resolutions. Heres’ how they do it. Accessed 10/29/2015. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/dandiamond/2013/01/01/just-8-of-people-achieve-their-new-years-resolutions-heres-how-they-did-it/

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